Tag Archives: Nixie Clock

On the K9ZW Build Bench – Winter Projects while Ice has me Off-Air

Here I’m stuck with serious Ice still on all my antennas after a full week from the “big storm.” Mother Nature sure was quick in the issue of the Ice and now is so slow in providing any relief melt. Sun is too weak and the temperatures too low to loosen more than 1/3 of the ice load.

Standing underneath to work mechanisms hoping the ice clears without damage wouldn’t be very safe. Two-Three pound chunks of ice falling 40-to-70 feet could do some damage. Also fear causing more damage by horsing the ice off. Safety first and then the knowledge that active efforts could make a small project in patience into a huge project in repairs, make waiting the ice out the best idea.

So I’ve been inventorying by electronic “to-build” kits and thinking about which to tackle next. For the most part I had reserved the present kits for deep winter builds – during that long stretch between New Years & Easter. Guess I will just move at least one kit forward.

On the shelf are a full range of kits:

Pretty well decided to tackle the Bubble Dial Clock kit next:

Evil Mad Scientist "Bubble Dial Clock Kit"

Evil Mad Scientist "Bubble Dial Clock Kit"

Followed by the Retro-75 AM QRP Transceiver:

Small Wonder Labs "Retro-75 AM QRP Transceiver"

Small Wonder Labs "Retro-75 AM QRP Transceiver"

The HF Packer-Amp would seem a natural third build if winter holds on that long:

HF Packer-Amp Kit

HF Packer-Amp Kit

And the Tuna-Tin Kits (with the various Nixie Tube Clocks) will wait for another season:

QRPMe Tuna Tin Kits "in the Can"

QRPMe Tuna Tin Kits "in the Can"

Of course things might change…..

73

Steve
K9ZW

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REPOST: Nixie Tubes – a Blast from the Past

*** A friend had asked for copies of the Dekatron & Nixie Tube Posts***

***which seems a good excuse to repost them ***

In the midst of the all my computer chaos I’ve also started another project – building a Nixie Tube Clock kit.

What are Nixie Tubes?  They are a Cold Cathode Display Tube harkening back to the Cold War.  For the most part most Western Countries dropped Nixie Tubes in the Early to Mid 1970s, but the former USSR kept them in production another 20 years.

 

Nixie Tube of the type I am using

Nixie Tube of the type I am using

 

 

The Clock Kit I’m doing was sold by a UK based Nixie Specialist and uses the IN-12 & IN-17 size tubes. 

 

Nixie Clock Frank in a plain case

Nixie Clock "Frank" in a plain case

I’ve something quite different in mind for my case.

 

Former USSR countries are  the primary source for bulk Nixie Tubes, and though these tubes have rated lifetimes measured in many decades bulk packs of spare IN-12 & IN-17 tubes were also sourced, along with a good supply of the FET transistors and driver micro chips for further experimentation.

Will do some build pictures for a follow up.

73

Steve
K9ZW

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REPOST: Building with Nixies, Dekatrons and Other Unusual Display Tubes

*** A friend had asked for copies of the Dekatron & Nixie Tube Posts***

***which seems a good excuse to repost them ***

A Dekatron Tube in ActionA Dekatron Tube in ActionA Dekatron Tube in ActionA Dekatron Tube in ActionA Dekatron Tube in Action

There is a whole wonderful world out there of really interesting display tubes from the 1950’s on that used a variety of methods to display numbers, control displays and in some cases like the Dekatron even count data and display the results.

You can do a web-search on any of the tubes and come up with various websites ranging from offers to sell artwork grade clocks featuring the retro-tubes driven by modern circuits to do-it-yourself projects.

One website that has a great amount of explanation on how the tubes work and includes some of the least common interesting tube type is

Roland’s Electronic Project Site

Roland covers an amazing variety of of these vinatge tubes with repeatable projects. His father started him on the path by bringing home strange tubes and taking the then young Roland to the speciality shops where they could be found.That youthful introduction has lead to lifetime of building and experimenting with the neatest of vintage display tubes!

Some of the Tubes that Roland Explains and Builds with in a Montage

I found that I have returned to his website many times as we design our Nixie Tube clock project.

Recommended Website!

73

Steve
K9ZW

Tagged , , , , ,

Nixie Tubes – a Blast from the Past

In the midst of the all my computer chaos I’ve also started another project – building a Nixie Tube Clock kit.

What are Nixie Tubes?  They are a Cold Cathode Display Tube harkening back to the Cold War.  For the most part most Western Countries dropped Nixie Tubes in the Early to Mid 1970s, but the former USSR kept them in production another 20 years.

 

Nixie Tube of the type I am using

Nixie Tube of the type I am using

 

 

The Clock Kit I’m doing was sold by a UK based Nixie Specialist and uses the IN-12 & IN-17 size tubes. 

 

Nixie Clock Frank in a plain case

Nixie Clock "Frank" in a plain case

I’ve something quite different in mind for my case.

 

Former USSR countries are  the primary source for bulk Nixie Tubes, and though these tubes have rated lifetimes measured in many decades bulk packs of spare IN-12 & IN-17 tubes were also sourced, along with a good supply of the FET transistors and driver micro chips for further experimentation.

Will do some build pictures for a follow up.

73

Steve
K9ZW

Tagged , , ,