Non-Radio – Bastille Day arrival of a Citroen CX 2400 Pallas Automatic

Writing this on Bastille Day 2021, and hours ago a transporter delivered a 1981 Citroen CX 2400 Pallas Automatic bought in France December 2020, renovated in Holland January to April 2021, and on what must have been a slow boat for the last 8 weeks of land/sea/land transportation.

CX Pallas tucked away after arrival in Wisconsin

A view of the Engine Compartment

Another tucked-away photo – will be waiting for the Wis. DMV paperwork to drive it on the street

My friend Jeremy located the car late in 2020 while he was in France as the widow who had the car had engaged help to sell her late husband’s cars. Based on my friend’s observations, videos and photos I purchased the car as there was no way I could get to France. What interested me about this car is the rust-free and unmolested single-owner history and relatively low miles. So I am the second owner of this 40 year old beauty!

Arrangements were to have Citroen Andre prepare the car as if he was sending his family out in the car for an extended (and unsupported) several month long road trip

First hurdle was getting the CX from France to Holland during the lockdown. Seems that some truckers had dispensation to operate when most people couldn’t even go outside!

A picture in France of the CX Palls being loaded during the lockdown. Destination “Citroen Andre” restoration shop in Holland.

To do the depth of work I’d requested the drive train had to be removed.

Citroen Andre did an drive-train out “deep service/light-restoration”

I could write for a long time to cover all the work that was done. I really didn’t want to leave any stone unturned.

Lots of work like replacing seals, cables, hoses, gaskets….very extensive list.

While the car ran, because of age a number of common restoration points were done like carburetor rebuild, new kick-down cables, new timing chain, new hoses…

Rebuilt of course!

Timing chain replacement time.

New rotors, rebuilt calipers, new spheres, lines…

Where appropriate in-keeping updates like an improved radiator, updated ignition, updated/rebuilt A/C were included in the scope of work.

As it was going back together. New radiator, updated electronic ignition, new harnesses, rebuilt AC….

In a few cases Citroen Andre had work done outside of their shop by specialists. The headliner’s sound-deadening foam had crumbled and I think it was CX Basis in Germany to made up the new headliner, and a Dutch specialist who installed it. Came out really nice!

Old CX cars drop their headliners as the foam layer dries out, so a new headliner was prepared and installed by a specialist

Eventually the car was ready and after much delay the shipping process started with a simple truck-ride to the port.

In Holland leaving Citroen Andre for the port. Again it was during a local lockdown.

A quick contrast to the 1981 CX Athena I also own (which is similarly in outstanding condition).  The Athena (name means “nearly a goddess” is a 2 liter five-speed intended to be the “standard” sort of version of the CX series.  The smaller engine cost less to register and run with the tax codes of the day.  If given out as a company car the Athena would be what department head might get.

The CX 2400 Pallas Automatic is the deluxe version, more chrome and comfort, and was positioned to be what the Managing Director/Chairman might drive, if he was someone who drove themselves.

Citroen also did a “Prestige” version that was really a limo for the chauffeured driven Managing Director/Chairman and political types, and various wagon versions.

Now it is the waiting game for the Wisconsin DMV to issue the registration for the CX 2400 Pallas Automatic.  I hope that arrives in time to make some of the August local car shows as I would like to take both CXs to some of them!

73

Steve
K9ZW

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